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ILO L235: Cyberlaw and Cyberpolicy

Course Description

This course is an introduction to the legal issues of cyberspace. Legal issues in this domain are complex. Technology has been evolving faster than the law's ability to handle the changes, so partially this course will be an education in the legislating and policy making of moving targets. It will also be an education in jurisdiction, privacy, surveillance, and copyright as it relates to the Internet. The perspective will be from US law and jurisprudence, although there will be periodic forays into international issues. Topics covered will include cyberlaw and cybergovernance, the Digital Revolution and its impact on First, Fourth, and Fifth Amendment issues, copyright in the Digital Age, and the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act.

Students need not be computer science majors to take Cyberlaw and Cyberpolicy, but the course will assume some familiarity with how the Internet works as well as some familiarity with laws and policy making. The latter need not be through formal education --- e.g., it could come from frequent reading of the press. By this, I mean the parts of the press that cover legal issues in a thoughtful and detailed way (e.g., the New York Times (Links to an external site.) or the Washington Post). (Links to an external site.) During the course, students will be expected to integrate knowledge of technology with law, politics, economics, and domestic and international affairs. There will be significant amounts of reading, writing, and discussion in this class (and no programming).

Course faculty: Susan Landau
Course duration: Full semester