South Sudan's political marketplace in eight cartoons. Art by Victor Ndula and text by Alex de Waal.

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Explore Sudan and South Sudan's recent political history and access key documents on our interactive timeline.

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Can we improve civilian protection by studying how mass atrocities have ended in the past? UN Photo/Martine Perret

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Sudan Peace Archive

The WPF's Sudan Peace Archive allows unprecedented access to the process of mediation in the Sudans.

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For over 100 years, the WPF has sought to educate about the waste and destructiveness of war and preparation for war.

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Updates
Research

Peace Missions in Africa

The WPF is spearheading research on peace missions in Africa, drawing upon African expertise and insight, in order to inform an African-led agenda for a new generation of political initiatives in support of peace, and international missions involving armed peacekeepers in the continent. The project will culminate in an independent Report to the African Union.
Update

New WPF Board Trustee

Deborah Chasman PhotographDeborah Chasman is Coeditor of Boston Review. Prior to that she worked at Beacon Press (1989-2002) where she developed the list in race, ethnicity, and social justice before becoming Editorial Director. She has served as a judge for the National Magazine Awards and the Pulitzer Prize. Click here to learn more about the WPF Board of Trustees.

Publication

WPF affiliated research

Claire Smith (York University), a researcher with WPF's How Mass Atrocities End project, published "Illiberal peace-building in hybrid political orders: managing violence during Indonesia's contested political transition," in Third World Quarterly. Read how she employs the concept of 'hybrid political orders' to analyze the logic of illiberal peace-building processes in transitional states.
From the Archives

Renunciation of War

Publication

Ending Mass Atrocities

Learn more about the intellectual work behind WPF's How Mass Atrocities End project in a new essay by Bridget Conley-Zilkic and Alex de Waal, "Setting the Agenda for Evidence-Based Research on Ending Mass Atrocities," published February 2014 in the Journal of Genocide Research.
In the news

De Waal on Sudan and South Sudan

Read Alex de Waal's recent writings on Sudan and South Sudan on our blog: "South Sudan obtained independence in July 2011 as a kleptocracy – a militarized, corrupt neo-patrimonial system of governance."
From the blog

Visualizing South Sudan

Find out why Alex de Waal’s March 13, 2014 essay, "The Culprit: The Army” from his Visualizing South Sudan series is the most popular blog contribution thus far in 2014. One excerpt: “There are 745 generals in the SPLA. That’s 41 more than in the four U.S. services combined, and second only to Russia’s 887 generals and admirals in the world.”
Occasional Paper

Gender, Peace and Conflict

Dyan Mazurana and Keith Proctor draw on interdisciplinary research to provide a summary of the key literature, frameworks and findings in five topic areas related to Gender, Conflict, and Peace, and suggest areas that need further research. Questions addressed include: How does a gender analysis inform our understanding of armed conflict and peace-making? What are the gendered dimensions of war, non-violent resistance, peace processes, and transitional justice?
Blog

Zocalo event: How to stop genocide

  • Below is an excerpt from an article, “When it comes stopping genocide, there’s a will but not a way” by Sarah Rothbard summarizing the Zócalo Public Square sponsored event, “How to stop genocide?” held May 4, 2015 at the Goethe Institute in Los Angeles, which featured WPF’s Bridget Conley-Zilkic as one of the [...]

  • The rent seeking rebellion cycle

  • Episode seven in the eight part comic illustration of South Sudan's predicament, with art by Victor Ndula and text by Alex de Waal. Sponsored by the Cartoon Movement, JSRP, and World Peace Foundation.
  • One cubic metre: a reflection on water for mystery, learning and peace

  • Water is stored, divided, cleaned, guided, reused, consumed, returned, delayed, degraded and cycled. Water puzzles humans in ways that that can test and grow our humanity. Water and irrigation interested Nobel Laureate Elinor Ostrom throughout her career. Water’s coaching of society’s early civilisations drew the attention of Karl Wittfogel. Water joins nations in treaties and brings together villagers in small associations. Yet water asks engineers, lawyers, economists, anthropologists to watch how nature and people actually use water (and other resources) without recourse to training and ‘disciplines’. I call people who closely and carefully rely on water for their living ‘waterists’.