Courses

Courses

The Murrow Center sponsors a variety of academic courses for students enrolled at the Fletcher School covering communications and public diplomacy.

During the 2005 academic year, the Center's course offerings are:

DHP P231 - International Communication

Assistant Professor Gideon

This course provides students with a broad overview of the international information and communication field, using an interdisciplinary approach. It will provide students with an overview of the elements of international communication, their governance, their relationship to governments, and some of the most relevant policy issues. The course begins with the elements of international communication, broken into two categories: infrastructure and content. We explore governance of international communication (both content and infrastructure) as well as its relationships to governments. This contextual foundation is then followed by explorations of several of the major policy issues of international communication. Students will also have the opportunity to explore an area of particular interest in greater depth through a research project. Some important questions that will be addressed throughout the course include: How do the different means of international communication influence international relations and world affairs - and how has it changed with new technology and the new media? What is the impact of international communication on governance? Or governments on international communication? What is the impact of ownership and industry structure in the information and communication industries on the nature of international communication? When are communication technologies the means for greater freedom and when for greater domination?

DHP P232 - Communications Policy Analysis and Modeling

Assistant Professor Gideon

Telecommunications is an international field with both common and varying policy problems throughout the world. Many of these problems have proven complex, evidenced by the vast amounts of passionate disagreement among intelligent well-meaning parties and individuals, and by the failure of many chosen policies in different countries to achieve their objectives. Thus policy analysis is an important skill in this area. Both the ability to develop models to better understand policy issues and the ability to understand the models and analyses developed by others is becoming increasingly important for students who will be faced with these issues in their careers in the public sector, in private industry, or in NGOs or other organizations. We will focus on understanding different types of problems and developing the skills necessary for building and understanding relevant models. We will explore several telecom policy issues and the analysis relevant to understanding these issues. Each of these issues may be looked at from the perspective of the consumers (including potential consumers currently not consuming), the firms, the governments and regulators, and the NGO. Students have the opportunity to analyze a policy or business issue of interest in greater depth in a group analytic exercise. Policy issues and fundamental models and tools are emphasized over specific technologies, providing students with a strong background to confront the new policy challenges they will encounter from an informed analytic perspective, as technologies continue to evolve. Open to students who have completed either EIB E201 or EIB E211 or the equivalent.

DHP P233 - International Information and Telecommunications Technology and Policy

Adjunct Associate Professor Cukor

Technology has become one of the dominant driving forces of our society. It has a profound influence on the way we perform our work, spend our leisure time, obtain our education, travel and communicate with each other. We are living in an information dominated society in which we are exposed and connected to events and developments around the clock. To dispel any apprehensions or misconceptions: This is not a course in physics, nor does this course require any significant background in science and technology. This is a course in understanding basic technical concepts and relating these concepts of technology to issues of policy. The student should be able to build on the foundation provided by this course and learn readily about more complicated technical and policy issues such as information technology related policy modeling and analyses. The course has two basic components: technology and policy. The technology lectures consist of conceptual descriptions of such topics as Internet technologies or wired and wireless communications technologies. The interwoven policy lectures cover issues related to these technologies.

DHP P234 - The New Digital Media: Technologies and Their Societal Impact

Adjunct Associate Professor Cukor

Technology has made a lasting impact on the news media. We are exposed to 24 hour news coverage by radio and cable TV stations, media and publicity Internet sites. Print media had to adjust to these realities and assume a new role as supplier of details and background information rather than disseminator of breaking news. Many of these changes have been the direct result of the replacement of traditional analog technologies with new digital methodologies. Also, recently, a new type of correspondent has emerged. One, which besides the traditional notebook and pen, also carries a laptop computer, a digital still and video camera, satellite phone and other electronic equipment. This reporter is a writer, photographer, producer, director and broadcaster all in one. Such person can report instantly upon arriving at any part of the globe without having to worry about protocols and censorship. The purpose of this course is to provide the students with fundamental concepts associated with digital reporting. Besides the technologies, some issues of policy and social impact will also be discussed.

DHP P235 - The Dynamics of International Communications and Public Diplomacy Today

Adjunct Instructor Snow

In a world of multiplying government voices, exploding forms oaf medial and ever greater variety of internationally vocal non governmental organizations including corporate, the field of public diplomacy is infinitely more complex when first (and named by the then Dean of The Fletcher School) conceptualized in the mid 1960's. It is driven by a range of different players and mediums with varying motivations in the total equation of how government policies are projected and reflected internationally. In the legacy of premier journalist and statesman Edward R. Murrow, this course will address the fluid equation of public and private forces on the world of public diplomacy. It will be driven by the perspective of the practitioner more than by a conceptual one. Through readings, lectures and guest lectures, the course will be structured around the interplay of government with three strong and independent players - the media, NGO's and corporations - to highlight the principles and practices of public diplomacy today.